oslo strikkefestival 2017: saltstraumen

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It’s ended up being a busy summer and I’m a little behind on sharing new work, but I have an exciting pattern to share today! I was fortunate to be asked again this year to contribute a pattern to the magazine for the Oslo Knitting Festival, and I was so happy to say yes. This year I designed a hat called Saltstraumen, and it’s a little bit of a love letter to northern Norway.

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Saltstraumen is a maelstrom located in the county of Nordland (and I actually got to visit it last fall during our road trip around Nordland, blogged here). It’s a spectacular place with one of the strongest tidal currents in the world, where the water rushing through the bottleneck during the changing of tides creates whirlpools and white water dancing in circles. I adapted a cable motif from Norah Gaughan’s excellent Knitted Cable Sourcebook to mimic the swirling of the water across this hat, which is knit in beautiful indigo-dyed yarn from Lofoten Wool. Lofoten Wool, as you may remember from my Norwegian Wool post on the company, is also located in Nordland, and water obviously plays a huge role in the lives of the people throughout the Lofoten archipelago. I love the deep connection between the motif inspired by water, the deep blue of the indigo dye, and the wool from Røst, one of the islands of Lofoten furthest from the mainland – it’s not every day so many elements come together in a design like that.

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Saltstraumen is knit up in Lofoten Wool’s Røst Collection 2-ply (look for “2 trådet” in their online shop) in the Brådjupt colorway. If substituting yarn, a woolen-spun sport weight would be ideal. The pattern is available in the Oslo Knitting Festival Magazine, alongside a pattern by Julie Knits In Paris (pictured above along with the Saltstraumen hat) and one by Anna Maltz. I believe the magazine is print-only, not digital, but if you have questions about that I’d suggest getting in touch with the festival organizers or perhaps asking in the new Ravelry group for the festival.

As a side note, I’m planning to make my pattern for last year’s magazine, the Rosenhoff mittens, available for individual purchase this fall. I’ll be sure to let you know when they’re available!

oslo strikkefestival: yarn

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I have a few posts-in-progress lined up for the blog once I have a chance to finish them, but as school has intensified this term, and the US election season approached its climax in the past weeks, it’s been a bit of a struggle to get anything finished. And today, after having woken up to the results at six in the morning yesterday, I’ll admit I’m feeling at a bit of a loss. This week is tough for many of us, American or otherwise.

But in an attempt to turn toward the positive: I spent this past weekend at the Oslo Strikkefestival (for whom I designed my Rosenhoff Votter), in the company of a collection of absolutely incredible people. I’d love to share more about the experience soon – the fantastic organizers Katie and Tone, the workshops and the marketplace and the general atmosphere, meeting so many people in person who I’ve interacted with online. It was truly wonderful. But right now what I really need is a couple of mental health days before I dive headfirst back into my thesis work. So I thought for now I’d just share what I picked up from the marketplace – which, after reading the vendor list in advance, I was greatly anticipating.

You all know I’m working to buy less yarn and knit from my existing stash whenever possible, but I’ve known for months that I was going to make a big exception for Oslo Strikkefestival. Having started the Norwegian wool series on this blog (which I hope to get back to soon!), I’m super interested in exploring new-to-me yarns that are domestically sourced and produced in Norway. I’ve also lately become interested in the world of Norwegian hand-dyed yarns, as many of those businesses are only just getting started. The marketplace at this past weekend’s festival was an absolutely fantastic place to check out a large sample of Norwegian-made and/or Norwegian-dyed yarns in person all at once. And so I came home with a few things… and you can see from the photo at the top of this post that I didn’t stray from my typical color palette too far. There are worse things than being predictable, though, I suppose.

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I’ve written about how much I love Hillesvåg and their pelsull yarn on this blog before, so I was very happy to pick up a skein of a new weight of pelsull. Sølje is a lovely fingering-weight version and it’s surprisingly soft. Hillesvåg has kept with their tradition of naming their yarns after things related to Norwegian tradition and folklore, as sølje is also the name for the brooches typically worn with the bunad, the national folk costume. The Hillesvåg booth didn’t have a lot of this yarn left by the time I made my way over to pick some up, but I snagged this skein in the color lys rødlig beige, or “light reddish beige.” I’m not sure yet what it will be but I’m very curious to see how this weight knits up compared with the sport weight Pelsull and the bulky Blåne.

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Next up is something different, although still in my typical grey: this is the Kid Silk base from Norne Yarns in the Fenrir colorway. Tuva of Norne Yarns was a vendor at last year’s festival as well, and her specialty is luxury bases (I didn’t asked her specifically about the sources of the bases but I assume they’re sourced abroad). The diversity of yarns in the marketplace was one of the most exciting things to me – although I am a huge advocate for Norwegian wools, I think a Norwegian dyer working with luxury bases is an excellent niche to fill and I’m quite looking forward to trying this yarn out. This grey color is called Fenrir after Fenrir the grey, the great wolf from Norse mythology (also the inspiration for the werewolf Fenrir Greyback in the Harry Potter universe). One of my favorite things about Tuva’s yarns is the Norse mythology woven through all the names, right down to the brand name itself – Norne – as the Norns are the Norse version of the female Fates who rule the destinies of men (artwork of the Norns spinning the threads of fate at the bottom of Yggdrasil is easy to find). Fans of Norse mythology will recognize many names in Norne’s colorways: Yggdrasil, Valkyrie, Freyr, the Mistress of Seidr (which refers to Freyja), Skadi, Ratatosk, and many more.

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Nina Petrina is probably my most local indie dyer, as Nina is from Troms (my county), just a short drive away from Tromsø over in Storfjord. I recently knit her Nordlyslue (northern lights hat), and I was looking forward to checking out more of her yarns in the marketplace. I was also really happy to meet Nina in person, as she is lovely! Not all of her yarns are domestic Norwegian wool – in fact, she carries some Quince & Co. yarns – but her focus is on organic and fair trade wool and she’s very environmentally conscious. I picked up some of her Tynn Bluefaced Leicester (hooray for breed-specific wools!) in this beautiful teal shade that almost perfectly matched one of the stripe colors of my Fringe & Friends KAL sweater, which I was wearing at the time. I’m not sure what I’ll use this for yet, but it’s going to be beautiful.

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This yarn is one of the ones I’m the most excited about but at this point I can give you the least specifics. It’s from the indie dyer I was perhaps the most eager to see: Værbitt. The name literally means “weather-bitten,” and it’s a word that I as a foreigner associate most strongly with the Norwegian national anthem, as it appears in the third line of the first verse (the only verse I know by heart). I had a lovely chat with Laila, the owner (and I probably gushed a bit), because Laila uses mainly Norwegian-sourced wools and Nordic breeds for her bases. The yarn above is spun from spælsau wool, both the sturdy guard hair layer as well as the softer inner layer of wool, so it’s very sturdy even as a single-ply, and absolutely beautiful. I’m very excited to follow Værbitt’s work in the future.

All four of the above yarns were ones I planned to check out and I was expecting to come home with – but of course, there were a couple of curve balls, too. They came home with me because these are the yarns I actually have concrete plans for, unlike the ones above.

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Claire of We Love Knitting traveled all the way from Melbourne, Australia to be a vendor at the marketplace, and she is honestly and without exagerration probably the sweetest person I have ever had the pleasure of meeting. I came home with a skein of her Merino Fingering in the Icicle colorway (at bottom) and her Sock base in a beautiful grey (top). These will become a pair of Lumineux socks, from this year’s Knitworthy collection from Ysolda. Thankfully I can always use more handknit socks here.

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And last but definitely not least, I think I’m actually incapable of resisting a beautiful greyscale gradient. This one came from Squirrel’s Yarns, another one of the international vendors – Lisa is based in France and her gradients were one of the first things that caught my eye at the marketplace. This one is in her Pécan Fingering base, which has a bit of silver stellina in the yarn that gives it a lovely sparkle (which unfortunately doesn’t seem to photograph very well in my low winter light). I’m pretty sure this is going to become a Lupine shawl, a pattern by my friend Cory I’ve been wanting to knit for a long time. I actually had another stash yarn set aside for that, but this one feels like an even better fit.

Thanks again to Katie and Tone and everyone else who made Oslo Strikkefestival so fantastic this year. It was a bright spot in the midst of a dark time.

rosenhoff mittens

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I decided to write about Telespinn last week because I used one of their yarns for a very special pattern: meet the Rosenhoff mittens (or Rosenhoff Votter), my contribution to the magazine for this year’s Oslo Strikkefestival. The festival is only in its second year this year, but it sounds like last year was a flying success and I can’t wait to head down to Oslo this November and check it out for myself (yes! I’m coming to the festival!). I had the chance back in February to meet Katie, who runs the festival (and also works at Grünerløkka yarn store Pickles) and I was thrilled when she asked if I’d be willing to contribute a pattern for the magazine. Two other patterns are included: the beautiful and intriguing Gokstad Hat by Julie Knits in Paris, and the Oslo Skirt by Maja Karlsson, which features a interesting construction details and lovely stranded colorwork at the waistline. All three patterns are available for free in the Oslo Strikkefestival magazine, found here on their website if you weren’t able to get one at the launch party. Currenly the written instructions are in Norwegian only, but the whole mitten is charted after the ribbing and I’m hoping to put together the English translation soon.

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I had a lot of fun working up the charts for these mittens and I’m very pleased with how they turned out. They’re knit up in fingering-weight Symre (for the sample the main color is Sjøgrønn and the contrast is Lysgrå). A primarily mohair yarn is not the most traditional choice for what are otherwise rather traditional Norwegian mittens, but I felt like the spirit of Telespinn as a company is very Norwegian and that it would be a good fit for both this design and the festival itself. The resulting fabric created when the mohair-wool blend is worked stranded is a bit airier than wool would be, but it’s also very warm. I took these mittens on a test run at an outdoor music festival in Tromsø this past weekend – the high temp the day I wore them was 8ºC / 46ºF and they kept my hands quite warm!

I decided to name the pattern after the area where I lived two summers ago while attending the International Summer School at the University of Oslo. Rosenhoff is on the east side of Oslo just north of Carl Berners plass, and aside from my personal connection to the area, the floral connotations of the name felt like a good fit for the two main flowery motifs on the back of the hand. It’s a really lovely part of town that I’ll probably always have a fondness for – that summer was like something out of a picture book.

I should also mention that if you’re planning to attend the festival and you knit one of the three official patterns from this year’s magazine (these mittens included), you can be entered to win a 500 NOK gift card to be used in the marketplace! And if you start a project but haven’t finished by the time of the festival, no biggie – just upload a photo of your WIP or FO to Instagram with the hashtag #oslostrikkefestival and you’ll be entered. More info about the competition can be found on the Oslo Strikkefestival website here. And the Rosenhoff Votter can be found on Ravelry here.

If you’re planning to attend the festival I look forward to seeing you there!