blog

Category
Back to all posts
  • slow fashion october: what's your look?

    Every year when Slow Fashion October kicks off, I read along and think about how I'd love to properly join the discussion. But for the past three Octobers, I was either working on a master's degree or dealing with my transatlantic move, and taking the time for the kind of reflection I think Slow Fashion October deserves has always felt like a challenge – let alone being able to write about it and share with others. This year, however, I'm beginning the month as I mean to go on. Slow fashion is something I think about year round, so taking the month of October to try and sort through some of my thoughts and feelings seems like a really great opportunity this year.

    Slow Fashion October was started by Karen Templer over at Fringe Association in 2015, and every year there's always a great discussion over different media platforms, often aided by themes or discussion prompts provided by Karen. There's no need to follow her own outline if you want to take part in the discussion of Slow Fashion October, but they are a useful guide when the topic feels overwhelming (and it can!). So I thought I'd kick off this month with the discussion prompts Karen posted on her blog today. I've skipped a few of the questions to keep this post from getting too long, but the overarching theme is: what's your look?

    Do you have a color palette?

    Most definitely. My Ravelry profile has, for years, read "blues, greens, greys" next to the "favorite colors" questions (don't you love that they say colors, plural, instead of trying to limit us to one?). That's held true for the past ten years that I've had my Ravelry profile. The first sweater I ever knit was purple, but sweaters number 2, 3, and 4 were green, grey, and blue, respectively. I knit with those colors a lot, and I wear those colors a lot. Blue is one of my neutrals, and blue or black jeans plus a grey t-shirt is one of my most commonly worn outfits. Lately, different shades of burgundy, dusty pink, and mustard have also been creeping into my wardrobe, and this is showing up in my knitting as well. Seeing it all together, though, it still manages to feel like a very cohesive palette. When I look at these colors, they feel very, very me.

    Is there a brand you’re always drawn to, for their clothes and/or how they put them together? Why?

    Jennifer Glasgow has been a favorite for years. I first discovered her clothing while shopping at Velouria in Seattle – it's a wonderful store with a selection of clothes from North American brands whose clothes are made domestically, either within the United States or Canada (if you find yourself in Seattle, I can't recommend them enough). Velouria was a huge part of my own journey towards thinking about incorporating slow fashion into my wardrobe. Jennifer Glasgow is based in Montreal, so I was excited when moving here that I'd get to shop at her flagship store General 54 on a regular basis - which for me, means about twice a year, each time the new collection is released. Aside from the fact that I really like the style and cut of a lot of Jennifer's pieces, and that they fit me well, she's very transparent about her production process and who's making the clothing, and she often prioritizes natural fibers over synthetics in her fabric choices, which is something I really appreciate and want to support.

    What is your favorite garment or outfit (right now or always) and why?

    I spent my summer in a piece from Jennifer Glasgow's spring/summer collection this year that I'm still just obsessed with, called the Mariner dress. In the past I've gone for more fit-and-flare style dresses from her, but this one is oversized and loose, which makes it just the most comfortable dress to wear. It's a silhouette I started playing with earlier this year and I like it a lot – I find myself increasingly prioritizing comfort. I feel like I absolutely lived in this dress over the summer (if you shop at Espace Tricot in Montreal there's a very good chance you saw me in it) and I intend to keep wearing it into the fall.


    What is the image you would like to project with your clothing?

    A degree of put-togetherness, and confidence. 


    Can you describe your style in five adjectives?

    I absolutely couldn't – I have very little objectivity there – but I would be curious to hear how others would describe my style. If I were being aspirational, I would want my style to be classic, sophisticated, playful, comfortable, and maybe the tiniest bit sparkly. 

    What showed up in your mood board that surprised you?

    Considering that my fashion / style board on Pinterest is something I've been casually building without very much thought over the course of several years, it was interesting to see that it's very overtly feminine. I know that I'm someone who often swings back and forth between feminine styles and more masculine or androgynous styles from day to day or season to season, but in general I think I trend towards more androgynous and it feels like there's very little of that represented here. To me, it often feels like there's a conflict between some of the feminine styles I'm very drawn to, especially dresses, and the practicality that I want or need in clothing in climates where there can be a lot of wind, or a harsh winter, for example. My clothes became very utilitarian when I lived in Tromsø, and I wore very few skirts and dresses there, but a lot more skirts and dresses worked their way back into my wardrobe this summer in Montreal. So that's interesting. But I also think that I have a tendency to think my clothes are more androgynous than they really are – I have a distinct memory from the year in college when I cut my hair into a short pixie for the first time, and to me, that felt like a bucking of traditional ideas of femininity (and admittedly, as a six foot tall woman, I do sometimes mistakenly get called "sir" by strangers who aren't paying attention when my hair is really short). But I took a course on women and political science from the women's studies department that semester, and my professor pointed out to me that despite my short hair, my overall look in terms of clothes and presntation was still very, very feminine. And she was right. I think that has changed slightly in the years in between, but I do still think there can be a disconnect between what I think is happening in terms of how I dress and how I actually look to the outside world. All that being said, when I pin something to this board, it is something that I feel like I could / would actually wear, even if it maybe isn't representative of my style as a whole.

    What’s an example of something you own and love (had to have!) but never wear, and why not?

    Vintage shopping is really hit and miss for me, and I have a few vintage pieces that I rarely wear, either because of the fit of the piece, or the fabric it's made from. Even though I love them, they may only come out once a year (but at least it's not never!). My own size – my height as well as the muscularity of my shoulders (since I started exercising my upper body more after recovering from my shoulder break in 2016), both mean the top half of my body isn't really the same size or shape as the average woman from half a century ago. So often, things are too small for me. 

    --

    I'm looking forward to see what others have to say to the "what's your look?" question. If you want to follow the discussion as well, I'd suggest following the #slowfashionoctober hashtag on Instagram (you don't need an account to be able to see public posts that have been tagged), or following the Fringe Association blog – and there are always interesting discussions going on in the comments, so don't skip those.

    For those who are curious, three of the pieces in the outfit I'm wearing pictured up top fall under the slow fashion banner in different ways: the dress is a new one from Jennifer Glasgow made here in Montreal, the cardigan was picked up second-hand at a clothing swap several years ago, and the boots are Red Wing Heritage Iron Rangers from the women's line, made in the US.