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  • new pattern: oak hollow

    I think it's been a long time since I've written a dedicated blog post for a new pattern, but now that I'm publishing new designs less often (I think 2019 will be an 8-pattern year compared to last year's 24), it feels easier to sit down to write about a new design. I'm very pleased to introduce you to a pattern that's been a long time in the making: meet Oak Hollow.

    Some of you may be familiar with the fact that I'm quite interested in non-superwash hand-dyed yarn. Of course there's a lot of superwash hand-dyed yarn in my stash as well, but as dyers have increasingly been experimenting with non-superwash bases, I've been increasingly excited about it. So in June 2018, when Canadian dyer Lichen and Lace announced a new base made with non-superwash Canadian wool, I knew I wanted to try some (Lichen and Lace is located in New Brunswick and I was living in Montreal at the time, so while they weren't exactly "local," they were only one province to the east). So I ordered myself three skeins of Rustic Heather Sport.

    Being very fond of grey, I ended up with only one skein that was actually dyed – that gorgeous yellow to the left, Pollen. The two greys (Charcoal and Birch) are undyed colors. Yellow has never featured hugely in my wardrobe or my design work, but I thought this combination was absolutely gorgeous, and last summer I was already charting up an idea for a pair of fingerless mitts. I was incredibly busy with other patterns last fall, though, and didn't get around to starting these in time for them to be a fall release. And there was no question to me that they should be a fall release. So they got put on the back burner for awhile.

    When it came time to pack our suitcases for the move to Trondheim last May/June, I knew I'd have to be selective about what projects and yarn to pack (the majority of our stuff came separately and we will finally be reunited with it later this month when we move into our new place, and I am SO glad!). Not knowing how long I'd be away from the majority of my stash, I made sure to pack these skeins in the suitcases so that this pattern could happen this year. 

    In the end, it still took some time, and some trial and error. Some patterns just do. The first mitt I started working up I probably got three quarters of the way through before I realized/accepted that it was actually just way too small. I set it aside, went up a needle size, and started again. This time I knit the pair, which fit much better with one exception – after finishing, blocking, and wearing the mitts for a week or two, I realized I wasn't happy with the thumb gusset, which was still too small. So I frogged the finished mitts back to the place where the new thumb gusset would begin – which felt very close to the beginning – and knit them back up. But the effort was worth it! The new thumb gusset was a much better fit, and I'm so happy I took the time to get this one right, rather than rushing through it, even though that meant the pattern didn't come out until November 1. Maybe it still feels like autumn where you are, or maybe you're still waiting for the autumn weather to show up, but in Norway? Winter is setting in. We've had our first snow of the season today in Trondheim, and I know the Oslo area had the same this weekend. It's beautiful, but it's been nice to hang on to autumn a little bit through this design.

    I've been blown away by the enthusiastic response to this design and I can only say thank you. It's been so much fun to watch projects popping up on Ravelry and Instagram already. If you'd like to make your own mitts, Oak Hollow is knit with three colors of sport weight yarn at a gauge of 28 stitches per 4"/10 cm (at that gauge a fingering weight would probably also work for these mitts, particularly if it's woolen spun), and the pattern is written for two sizes. I think it would be relatively easy to work in two colors instead if you didn't want to bother with the very small amount needed of the third color. Overall, these mitts don't use a lot of yarn and would be great for leftovers. You can find all the details on the Ravelry pattern page.