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  • inspiration: kristin drysdale / scandiwork

    It's been a long time since I've posted an old-school inspiration post (something I used to do more often years ago), but I was browsing the Ravelry designer page for Kristin Drysdale earlier this week and I was reminded how much I love her work, and how much I adore one pattern in particular:

    I need to think of someone in my life who has a child I can knit one of these for, because it is just. too. perfect. I love it so very much. This is her Little Swedish Dress pattern, and while it's my favorite of her children's dress patterns, the Midsommar Dress and the Little Dutch Dress are super adorable as well.

    You may have encountered Kristin's work on Instagram, either on her own feed (where she is @scandiwork), or perhaps like I did - via the feed of Lori Ann Graham, who has knit a few pairs of Kristin's Hansdatter slippers. Kristin's array of beautiful stranded slipper designs is slightly dizzying, and it's hard not to want to make them all. She uses relatively traditional colors in her stranded patterns but makes them feel very fresh in an incredibly pleasing way, and my favorite pieces of hers are the ones where she uses assorted motifs grouped together to great effect, as in the dresses above or the pillow below, the Swedish Christmas Pillow.

    She recently released a few adult-sized garments as well, which makes me excited to see what else she'll be coming up with. Dagna is a circular yoke pattern available as a cardigan or as a pullover, and I think it demonstrates really well the traditional-yet-fresh thing that Kristin has going on. 

    There are too many beautiful slipper patterns to pick a favorite, so I encourage you to head over to Kristin's Ravelry page and take a look yourself. All of the ones pictured at the top of this post are available individually or as part of the Norseknits ebook. And if Kristin's work tugs at your heartstrings the way it does mine, you should check her out on Instagram at @scandiwork as well. (Bonus: she's also a fan of Scandinavian baking!)

    --

    Slipper photo by Scandiwork, Little Swedish Dress and Dagna photos by Ben Lehnardt.

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  • new pattern: frost flowers

    I've got a new pattern out today: meet Frost Flowers! I thought I'd tell you a little bit about how this design came to be.

    A month or so after we moved to Montreal, I went to an in-store Julie Asselin event hosted by Espace Tricot (where, incidentally, I am now working two days a week). Julie is a yarn dyer located a few hours outside of Montreal, and she's also one of the sweetest humans on the planet. Espace Tricot carries several of Julie's yarn bases, but she'd brought along a few bases to sell that the store doesn't normally carry, one of which was her Nurtured: a lofty but smooth woolen spun yarn in a worsted weight, unusual for an indie dyer. I'd first heard about this yarn when Tolt Yarn and Wool started carrying it while I lived in Seattle, but this was the first time I'd really taken a close look at it. 

    Most indie dyers purchase undyed yarn in ready-made bases, which is part of why so many of the bases are so very similar. Julie, on the other hand, has her bases spun for her, and Nurtured is even more unique since she dyes it in the wool. So in the case of Nurtured, she sources the wool from the US, dyes the unspun wool itself, and then sends the dyed wool to Green Mountain Spinnery in Vermont to have it spun into yarn. She outlines this process in a series of blog posts, which are excellent – you can see them in part 1, part 2, and part 3

    Flash back to the event at Espace Tricot - I was perched quite close to the Nurtured on the table as Julie talked about her yarns and answered questions, and I definitely found myself drawn toward one color in particular: the icy light blue color called Through the Looking Glass. When viewed up close, this is a gently heathered shade, with bits that are icy blue and bits that are almost light grey/natural and a few little blips here and there of a more saturated, darker blue. 

    A skein came home with me and once I had it, the idea for the overall palette took hold. I procured two more skeins of Nurtured, one in a heathered grey (Fer à Cheval) and one in a natural, undyed white (Natural), and started charting my colorwork ideas. It's no surprise that I gravitated toward this combo, because it encapsulates winter to me - I even knit up my personal pair of Hearth Slippers in a similar combination.

    I loved working with this yarn and I'm sure I'll use it again in the future. I'm also looking forward to trying more of Julie's yarns (I love her sock yarn, Nomade, which I used to knit my Amalia socks last year). Frost Flowers went live on Ravelry today, and you can check out the pattern page right here. It feels good to have a new Paper Tiger pattern to share - I didn't do very much self-publishing while I was working on my degree in Norway, since most of the time I had for designing went to my third-party work. I'm excited to start publishing more Paper Tiger patterns again this year, and I'm looking forward to sharing what I've been working on with you all.

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  • a wintry walk

    When we lived in Tromsø I was pretty good about getting out for walks on a regular basis. The goal was always a daily walk, and even if I sometimes fell short of that, it wasn't hard to find the motivation to get out for a walk when I was surrounded by so much natural beauty. Since moving to Montreal I have gone on fewer walks, especially since winter has set in. Given that in December we went through the longest continuous stretch of days that never made it above -17°C (about 1.5°F) in Montreal's recorded history, I suppose that's not a surprise. Lately, though, it's been much warmer (about -5°C / 23°F or so) and we've had a lot of snow, and I realized that I hadn't actually walked over to Parc La Fontaine since the snow first came. 

    I visited this park for the first time over the summer, when we were in Montreal looking for apartments before the move, and I fell in love with it immediately. It's a huge park to be in the middle of the city, full of trees and playing fields and with a pair of ponds (or one pond divided in two, depending on how you look at it) feauturing, as its name suggests, a big fountain. In summer, it feels like an oasis. The trees provide a leafy green canopy when you want a break from the sun and the heat, people picnic and laze in the grass, and take leisurely strolls on the paths through the park and around the ponds. It's one of those magical communal spaces that I'm so grateful exists.

    In winter, the experience is very different, unsurprisingly. I expected that there wouldn't be too many people in the park in the middle of a weekday, though there are a few, walking dogs or babies or simply going from point A to point B. The green grass is covered in a thick blanket of snow and the trees are bare. The main thoroughfares appeared to have been plowed, at least a little bit, but the park was also full of tracks from people taking shortcuts between the paths. 

    The ponds freeze over in winter and one of them is kept clear for skating. I'd heard about this before so I was pleased to see people on the ice. Having grown up in North Carolina, frozen ponds are the things of picture books to me (even after living in Norway), and it was fun to see that come to life before my eyes.

    One of the things that consistently catches me off guard about Montreal is how much the vegetation reminds me of the vegetation where I grew up. The tall deciduous trees are deeply familiar to me in a way that feels surprising in an otherwise pretty unfamiliar place. I moved to the west coast of the US after graduating from college, and grew to love the flora of the Pacific Northwest. Northern Norway presented a new set of trees, flowers, weeds, and herbs to become familiar with. But the vegetation here doesn't feel new or different the way that it did in those places. It's always so interesting to me which pieces of our childhood come back to the front of our minds when we least expect it.

    One thing I hadn't anticipated about the experience of being in Parc La Fontaine in the winter is how much more aware I was of the city surrounding me. You're still aware of being in the middle of the city in the summertime, but in winter when all the tree branches are bare you can't avoid it. It's easier to see downtown on the horizon when you look south/west, and all the buildings and the streets on the perimiter of the park are much easier to see and hear. It wasn't unpleasant, but it did make me want to head for Mount Royal next time I want to go for a long walk in the snow to get away from the feeling of the city.

    I wore my Brackett hat on what might have been its inaugural journey outside the house. This is a pattern of Whitney Hayward's for issue 3 of Laine Magazine, and I knit mine in the Harrisville Designs  Color Lab 2 yarn I brought back from Rhinebeck. There are so many different colors in this Harrisville yarn that it feels impossible to photograph correctly, but I think this photo gives you a little bit of an idea. (P.S. Have you seen the Bellows cardigan that Karen is knitting with it?)

    Today's walk was a lovely reminder that it's always a good idea to get out of the house for a walk, especially when the weather is good. I'll have to make sure to do it more often.

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  • a youtube channel and ravelry group

    I've been a little busy for blogging lately (there's something about this time of year, isn't there?), but I did want to pop over here to let you all know that I recently started a YouTube channel for Paper Tiger. I started watching knitting content on YouTube early this year, and I've enjoyed the way I've gotten to know some of the members of our fiber community a little better through the video format. I'm also hoping to start filming video tutorials in the coming year for certain techniques, and so the channel will be home to those, too.

    I've only put up a little introductory video so far, but I'm in the process of putting together the first proper video at the moment (about Norwegian wool - see this Instagram post if you'd like to leave comments about what you're interested in hearing about). You can watch the introductory video below.

    This intro is just a shortie, at not quite three minutes long. I expect future videos to be longer than that, of course, but this won't be a knitting podcast in the style you might be familiar with (with a weekly format, sharing WIPs and FOs and new yarn acquisitions and that kind of thing), and so I don't expect that my videos will be an hour long either. I'm hoping for a happy medium! I would love for the Norwegian wool video to go live before Christmas, but I'm not exactly sure when it will go up yet, so to keep up to date with that you can subscribe to the channel, which can be found at www.youtube.com/c/PaperTiger. Thank you so much to everyone who has already subscribed (!), and to those of you who've left comments on the intro video! I appreciate that so much.

    In a similar vein, I've also started a Ravelry group for Paper Tiger, which can be found at ravelry.com/groups/paper-tiger. I hope the group will be a place for questions and discussion about my patterns, or colorwork in general, but I also plan to post some testing calls in the group in the coming months, because I'd like to have some of my upcoming designs test knit before I publish the patterns. So do join the group if any of that sounds interesting to you!

    I'll be back very soon with some more posts. We have entered winter in Montréal this week with the season's first proper snowstorm, and so I anticipate a lot more time being spent indoors in the near future...

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  • recent FOs

    After a summer full of sample knitting for patterns, I was eager to get a bunch of personal projects off the needles once fall hit. I'm happy that I've managed to finish a few things recently, and I thought I'd share a few photos with you all.

    First up was my Garland sweater (which I initially wrote about planning to knit in this post, and I gave a little progress update here). I started it back at the beginning of May, but it got set aside when I needed to dedicate my knitting time to work knitting, and then it got packed with all our stuff in the move from Norway to Montréal, so when I was finally able to pull it out of a moving box in mid-October I was super eager to finish it (it was really close!).

    I will admit that I had some moments of doubt while this project was a work in progress, because both the color and the silhouette of the sweater are not my usual wheelhouse. I'd also never knit a sweater with laceweight yarn before. As a result, the finished garment was a pleasant suprise, because this is easily one of my favorite sweaters to wear that I've ever knit. The light weight of the fabric makes it super wearable and great for layers, and the cropped length means it's easy to layer over long shirts with jeans or skirts and dresses, which means it's one of the more versatile sweaters now in my wardrobe. It's very comfortable but there's a casual elegance about it too, with the bands of lace and the way the ribbed sleeves hug my arms without feeling tight. 

    The pattern is by Stefanie Pollmeier, from the winter 2013 issue of Pom Pom Quarterly (issue 7). I believe this pattern is still only available as part of the magazine. For yarn I used Welthase yak lace, rather than a mohair lace like the pattern was originally written for, and for me the yarn choice is definitely part of why this sweater already feels so versatile. Miriam, the dyer behind Welthase, has a wonderful sense of color, and I became pretty enamored with her pinks after getting to use her single fingering base for my Swedish Pancakes mitts

    I also finished what I've called my Pewter Cowl, a simple 1x1 ribbed cowl in Woolfolk Tynd.

    This was my mindless bus knitting project for months - something I could pick up and put down to work on whenever I had a moment without ever needing to refer to a pattern. It took me a long time to figure out what I wanted to make with this yarn (Woolfolk's wool is very, very soft) and in the end a simple and easy-to-wear project felt like the right way to let the yarn do the talking. The softness means it's suitable for against-the-neck wear, and it's relative lack of sturdiness will be less of an issue as a cowl than it would have been if I'd made mitts with this yarn, as I intended when I purchased it three years ago. I'm really pleased with this, but now I think I need a new mindless 1x1 rib project to work on...

    The last piece I want to share is my finished Circlet Shrug. The pattern is by Norah Gaughan, a creative force when it comes to cables, and she originally designed it for the third issue of Making magazine, which came out this past spring. (She will be releasing it as an individual pattern in the coming days, but I suggest checking out the whole issue of Making, because it's a beautiful issue!)

    This knit needed a lot of attention - there are cables every other row for the entirety of the sweater (save the bottom ribbing), and I had maybe almost memorized the chart by the time I was working the final repeats of the back. But it was a super interesting knit nonetheless, and I really adore the finished fabric. The Hillesvåg Tinde has such depth as a yarn, and I'm so pleased with how it's worked up into these cables. This was the last yarn I bought before we left Norway, so it's a bit of a special souvenir. I finished this the week after Rhinebeck, which I had originally hoped to knit it for, but given the temps we had during the days, I'm happy I didn't push myself to stress out over finishing. 

    Even though I design patterns myself, there is so much joy for me in getting to knit some of the beautiful pieces that my friends and colleagues have designed. But not to worry, I am working on more of my own patterns, too - I've also recently bound off on a garment design for an upcoming Paper Tiger collection! But more about that on another day. What are you all working on as we head into the tail end of the year?

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  • a rhinebeck weekend

    This time a week ago I was at my very first Rhinebeck. I took the train back to Montreal last Monday, a journey which is much longer than it seems like it should be (nine hours!), but I'm glad I had a little bit of time to myself to decompress after a whirlwind weekend before diving back into real life. What a wonderful weekend it was.

    I've wanted to write about it, but how is it possible to say everything I want to say about the weekend? While I enjoyed the festival itself, it was truly the magical combination of the festival, the fall colors and atmosphere, and especially the presence of a huge number of friends I don't get to see very often that made the weekend what it was. 

    It's admittedly a little strange to finally attend an event you've known about and watched others go to for years and years. There can be a lot of expectation tied up in the experience - is it is good as everyone says it is? Will I see everything I want to see? Do the apple cider donuts live up to the hype? (For the record, they do.) I think that for me, this trip came at exactly the right moment. I have been treading water a little bit since I left Norway and came to Montreal, trying to work out exactly who I am in this new city. Perhaps that sounds silly - I'm still me, after all - but I had become so accustomed to how I defined myself and presented myself to the world with Norway as a backdrop, that removing that backdrop and replacing it with something else left me feeling a little uncertain. Big moves and transitional periods don't always allow for a lot of self reflection in the moment, it turns out. It's after the fact that you realize there's something different about the person looking back at you in the mirror and you haven't figured out exactly what it is yet.

    So it was wonderful to have a new experience that made me feel very much like me, getting to spend time with friends I haven't seen since last year's Oslo Strikkefestival, or Edinburgh Yarn Fest 2016, or friends I'd never met in person but I've known a long time. This wooly knitting industry is overall a very warm and supportive place to be, and I am so glad for all of the people I get to call friends within it.

    I saw a lot of wonderful stuff last weekend. I fell in love with a number of yarns, but mostly stuck to my plan to buy one sweater's quantity as a souvenir (a few extra skeins came home with me, since Harrisville did a beautiful limited edition run of an irresistible blue). I was taking mental notes, though, checking out yarns I might want to try out in the future. I fell pretty hard for the naturally-dyed hues of Tidal Yarns's Romney wool, pictured below, and her booth was a reminder of why shows like this are so special - she doesn't sell her yarns online at all, but she does do around 15 shows a year.

    In the end, I didn't end up with a Rhinebeck sweater. I had been knitting away on my Circlet Shrug for a month and I got very close to finishing it - I was two cable repeats away from finishing the back. But with the weather in the 70s (fahrenheit), it worked out okay in the end. I finished knitting it on Wednesday, and will block it and seam the sides soon.. I did enjoy checking out the sweaters of those dedicated knitters (and crocheters) who wore their completed garments even in the heat. I also enjoyed checking out the animals.

    How could you not?

    I came home feeling refreshed, motivated, and creatively inspired. Thank you, New York Sheep & Wool, and thank you to everyone who made this weekend so special.

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  • moments

    Hello, October. I'm glad to see you. We've been in Montreal not quite three weeks now, and while in some ways we're starting to get settled in and find our new routines, in other ways I still feel stuck right in the middle of The Transition. We are waiting on the majority of our things to arrive from Norway, and I think once it does and we can really start unpacking, that will help a lot. I had forgotten how long it could take to find your stride in a new place, especially with such a big change.

    I started a semi-intensive French course this past week to try and get my long-hibernating French skills up and moving again, which gives me a place to go every weekday morning at 8:30. That's been beneficial. I have a backlog of design work I want to get to in the afternoons, though it's been really slow trying to get back into the work groove. In the meantime, I did cast on for the Circlet Shrug I mentioned in August, and that's been pure pleasure to work on. I'll be going to Rhinebeck this year (my first!), and I would love to be able to wear it there, but with only twenty days left the possibility seems slim...

    I am trying to pull my camera out and take pictures throughout my days. When I'm feeling a bit overwhelmed or a bit listless, I grab my bag and go for a long walk around my new neighborhood. I love the tree-lined streets and the unique architecture here, so just like in Norway, a good long walk is a great way to calm my mind or lift my spirits.

    I thought I'd share a few photos of the past few weeks - from my walks, working on my knitting projects, and welcoming the first rainstorm since our arrival. I think October is going to be a good month.

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  • a new chapter

    In my last post I mentioned that my husband and I were preparing for packing up and leaving Norway, but I didn't say where we were headed. After a couple of weeks of travel, we landed in our new home of Montreal (!) a week and a half ago, and already I don't know where that time has gone. Moving is so full of seemingly unending lists of practical/tedious/annoying/difficult tasks that need to be accomplished, and we've been working away at as much of that as we can. But so far, September has been on the whole a good month. And we are very happy to be in Montreal.

    We left Tromsø the last day of August and woke up on the first of this month in Helsinki, a city that neither of us had ever visited before. We were positively charmed and I definitely want to make it back to Finland someday to spend more time there. 

    After three nights in Helsinki, we were off to Crete for what was essentially the first of two "work trips" (I was presenting at a couple academic conferences). Crete was hot and sunny, but after the northern Norwegian summer, we were both pretty happy to be able to enjoy some proper summer weather. Three nights on Crete was followed by three nights on Mallorca for the second conference. 

    And then, finally, Montreal. We are setting up a new home in a light-filled space in the city, and very soon we will begin finding our new routines and our new favorite places. Already I've enjoyed simply walking the streets of my new neighborhood, choosing different routes to and from various errands in order to explore as much new ground as I can. I'm looking forward to meeting new people and going new places and getting to know this incredibly unique city better. Soon we'll have internet up and running at home and I hope then I'll be blogging again more regularly! Until then, you can find me going for long walks as I explore my new city.

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  • in the pipeline, august 2017

    I've just returned to Tromsø after about three weeks away, visiting friends and family in North America, but things aren't going to slow down any time soon; in the next three weeks we are packing up our place as we prepare to leave Norway by the end of the month (my degree is well and truly finished, and we're moving on to what's next for us... but more on that at a later date), followed by some travel for academic conferences, and then hopefully moving on to our new home and starting to get settled there. In the meantime, I'm daydreaming of garments.

    Tromsø's summer hasn't been much of a summer this year, as far as I can tell. Beyond a few spectacularly warm and beautiful days here and there, I think it's been largely wet and chilly. Spending time in North American summer for three weeks was a little bit of a shock - I think I managed to be in Seattle for the hottest week of the year there - and I'd forgotten how much really hot weather makes me positively pine for autumn. So, garments...

    I'm determined to get my Garland off the needles before I cast on any new garments (not to mention I'm still working on deadline knits, one of which is a sweater), but I'm on the second sleeve of Garland now and it feels like the end is near! So here's a glimpse at the next several garments I'm planning to cast on, all of which I already have the yarn for.

    First up is the Mount Pleasant tee by Megan Nodecker of Pip & Pin. I've been fairly obsessed with this tee since I first caught sight of it on Ravelry, when it was still in the testing stages. I've got two skeins of a special yarn set aside for this one: a merino singles base from Garnsurr, which is a small, new indie hand dying company here in Norway that's also a refugee integration project (you can read more about Garnsurr on their website in English - and if you're in the NYC, Do Ewe Knit in Westfield, NJ is stocking their yarns!). This is a project I'm so pleased to support, and this blue is going to be pretty gorgeous knit up. I think I'll probably cast on this one first once I've finished Garland. Incidentally, Megan has also started a video podcast on YouTube, so if you're into knitting podcasts, you should check it out!

    Next up is the Ingen Dikkedarer Genser, or the No Frills Sweater as it's known in English, by PetiteKnit (the pattern is available in Norwegian, English, Danish, and Swedish). This is a super simple fingering/sport weight sweater (one strand fingering held together with one strand lace mohair), and I found myself craving something just like this to wear during our lingering winter this year, especially around April/May. Warm and cozy, but lightweight and easy to wear. This one's exciting because I'm going to use the Berroco Ultra Alpaca Fine that I frogged during last year's Slow Fashion October, and it's good to find a new purpose for that yarn. I'm planning to hold it together with Pickles Silk Mohair in a similar dark grey, which I picked up in Oslo in May. 

    Third up is a very special combination: Norah Gaughan's Circlet Shrug from issue 3 of Making, knit up in an unusual-for-me shade of Hillesvåg Tinde, their sport/DK pelsull yarn (swoon - pelsull is the same fiber my Dalur is knit in; this is just a different weight). Looking at my existing sweater shelf, my affinity for blue, green, and especially grey comes through loud and clear, so between my pink Garland and this deep golden yellow shade, 2017 is turning into the year of getting out of my color comfort zone. It felt a bit crazy to buy this yarn, and when I got home the first thing I did was photograph it against my face to make sure I hadn't made a huge mistake. And while this color still makes me feel like a slightly skittish cat when I look at the pile of skeins on their own, the photo helps me feel more confident in this decision. It's a color I always find myself drawn to in autumn, so I'm willing to try it out in my wardrobe. 

    This was another pattern I fell in love with immediately the first time I saw it (it's easy to obsess over those cables), and I hope this yarn will work out for it. The Tinde is a woolen-spun 2-ply in structure, so it's not going to have the same amazing stitch definition as Brooklyn Tweed Arbor (which the sample was knit in), and the natural heathering of the yarn runs the risk of obscuring the cables further (although that natural depth, caused by the undyed grey shade of the yarn, is one of my favorite things about Hillesvåg's pelsull yarns). So it'll require a big and proper swatch to make sure I'm happy with the fabric before I move forward with it. And if it doesn't work out, I'll be happy to use this yarn for something else - it's a yarn I won't really be able to get easily once we leave Norway, so I wanted to scoop it up before we go, as a kind of souvenir of my two years here. 

    --

    Are you thinking about fall yet, or does it feel too early to you? What kinds of things are you thinking of casting on in the near future?

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  • norwegian wool: selbu spinneri

    The Norwegian Wool series returns with another of Norway's microspinneries, the fantastic Selbu Spinneri. One of two micro mills in Norway, it's a small operation that's only been spinning since 2011 (I believe there are just the two, the other being Telespinn, but if you know of any others please do let me know!). If the name sounds familiar to you, the Selbu is the same one you find in Selbuvotter, or Selbu mittens, the name for the iconic black and white Norwegian mittens (you may be familiar with Terri Shea's book, or the more recent the gorgeous and massive book by Anne Bårdsgård still only available in Norewgian as far as I know). Selbu is located near the city of Trondheim, in the middle of Norway's north-south span. The yarn made by Selbu Spinneri is special and Norwegian specific, with a focus on rare and endangered breeds. I made my first purchase from Selbu Spinneri earlier this year, back in the winter, and I opted to try three different yarns made from three different sheep breeds, pictured above. All three are very different - different weights, different textures that handle differently, and different colors - but they're all undyed yarns. This package was definitely a treat to open.

    The creamy off-white skein with a thick and thin texture is their 2-ply yarn made from wool from the gammel norsk sau, the Old Norwegian sheep, also called villsau ("wild sheep") by some, though it is a domestic breed. It's rustic and lofty, with some darker hairs mixed in with the cream, and it was the first skein I cracked into. It's a primitive heritage breed, with an outer fleece and a finer inner coat, like other northern European heritage breeds, and this yarn is spun from both layers, making it both robust and soft. It seemed to be about an aran weight to me, and I worked it up into a Simple Hat by Hannah Fettig. A very, very cozy Simple Hat. The finished fabric gives you a good sense of the varying thickness of this yarn, but you also get a sense of the halo it has after it was blocked. The Simple Hat is such a fantastic blank canvas pattern to get a feel for any yarn, thanks to the fact that it's written for a huge range of yarn weights.


    The light grey yarn in the middle is a 2-ply yarn made from spælsau wool. It looks to be about a sport weight to me, and like all spælsau yarns it's pretty dense and wiry. It's smoother with more of a sheen than the other two yarns I purchased, and I have a pretty good sense of how this yarn will work up since I've worked with spælsau yarns before.

    I'm not sure I'll knit with this one, actually - I think it would make a sturdy crochet fabric and I'm tempted to try using it for a small crochet basket or something like that. It'd also be great and durable for weaving, but as I'm not much of a weaver, crochet seems most likely.

    The final skein, the lovely heathered dark grey one, is spun with wool from a breed I have yet to work with, the trøndersau, or Troender sheep.

    The region where Selbu is located is called Trøndelag, making this breed its eponymous sheep (trønder + sau). The trøndersau is extremely rare, with a very small number of animals existing. I'm really looking forward to trying this yarn, too - it's a 3-ply, both rounder and a little bit more uniform than the other two yarns, and I'd guess it's a DK or worsted weight. I love natural grey yarns and this is a beautiful one. It's more textured than the other two yarns, with less gloss and more of a matte look. I expect good depth and stitch definition, so I might use it for something cabled.

    Being a small operation with only a handful of employees, Selbu Spinneri's online shop is definitely aimed at a domesetic market, and their invoicing and shipping methods don't really lend themselves to international shipping, so I don't think you can get these yarns outside of Norway UPDATE: I've been in touch with Selbu Spinneri and they are happy to accommodate international orders - simply get in touch with them at post@selbuspinneri.no if you're interested and they'll help you figure it out. I do know, however, that hand-dyer Laila of Værbitt Garn uses some yarns from Selbu Spinneri as her bases, so you can always get in touch with her or check her Etsy shop to see if you can find any of Selbu Spinneri's rare breed yarns (in Laila's gorgeous colors!). 

    Previous posts in this series can be found here:

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