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  • transitions

    Trondheim in the autumn continues to charm. I'm starting to adjust to the general level of busy-ness that my life here is going to involve, but it's definitely been a big shift for me. Partly that's because I'm still working on some patterns in the background along with my new day job at the university; partly it's because my PhD coursework has started as well and my to-do list is growing longer; and partly it's because we've still been living in temporary accommodations and it can be a challenge to get into routines when there are things about your living situation you can't change. But we'll be moving into our new long-term home in November, and I'm really looking forward to that.

    While we wait for that, though, the weather continues to shift. The leaves are changing, but we still haven't reached peak color yet. We had a couple of weeks of solid rain in the middle of the month before the sun came back out last week. I was in Kraków for a conference the tail end of last week and over the weekend, and I got home to Trondheim last night after dark. This morning I woke up to much cooler weather than we had last week (a few degrees above 0°C) and saw that the higher peaks in Bymarka (which are still relatively low) had a dusting of snow on them. The mountains across the fjord, as well. Now it well and truly feels like Norwegian autumn. I love Norway at this time of year, and I still can't get over how much longer and slower the autumn is here in Trondheim compared with up north in Tromsø. This city is truly beautiful in its fall colors.

    One of the things the weather's change has brought on is a mild panic over the fact that I don't have that many warm clothes in my suitcases with me (the rest of our clothes are packed away with the belongings we moved from Montreal – patiently waiting in storage for us to move into our new place in November). I feel like I haven't had much time for knitting recently, but now I'm determined to knit a little more and a little faster, if I can. I have two sweaters which are only missing sleeves, so I feel like with some concentrated knitting time in the evenings I could finish this No Frills sweater by next weekend.

    I don't usually knit the same pattern over and over, but this will be my third No Frills (or Ingen dikkedarer as it's known in Scandinavia), and I'm approaching this one a little differently than my first two. I'll elaborate more on that when it's finished, perhaps, because each of them is different and brings something unique to my wardrobe even as they all feel like everyday staples. I adore this color, a limited edition colorway of Hillesvåg Tinde made for Drople Design called Villbringebær ("wild raspberry"). It's a color I fell head over heels in love with when Anne first launched it over a year ago and I'm so thrilled to finally be knitting a garment with it.

    So I've been enjoying knitting on this sweater very much, even if it's felt like slow going. Knitting on a wooly sweater goes so well with changing colors, chilly rainy days, and the smell of woodsmoke in the air, after all. I've been getting into the spirit of autumn in other ways too. Some of the local apples have been wonderful recently, and the other week I baked a fyriskaka (a Swedish apple cake with cardamom) from Fika, which is one of my favorite bakes for this time of year. I also received a massive bag of little plums from a friend at work – the plum tree in her garden went crazy this year, it seems – and I managed to turn some of those into a few jars of pickled plums and roasted plum butter. I've been enjoying the plum butter on toast or lomper in the mornings for breakfast. (We'll see about the pickles, which were more of an experiment.)

    I've also been getting out for long walks or little hikes whenever possible. Now that I've seen that the snow is encroaching on the mountains in Bymarka, I'd like to get in a short hike in the next week or two to soak up the season. I always enjoy walking by the water as well. I'm always drawn to the water like a magnet – the smell of saltwater was another thing I missed so much in Montreal. The Trondheim Fjord can feel so much like Puget Sound in Washington state, a similarity I really enjoy.

    Of course there are challenges that come with this transitional season (both of the year but also of our lives), but overall we have fallen in love with this city, and I was so happy to come home to it after a weekend away. I can't help but feel incredibly lucky that we get to live here. Vi trives godt her i Trondheim.