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  • midwinter reflections

    For me, January passed by in a flash. It brought cold weather: snow and ice and chilly winds, as it does in Montreal. When the weather was fine, I made an effort so spend some time outside. When it wasn't, I've been inside, working. Knitting. And sometimes baking. I actually really like January (maybe it's easier when it's your birthday month?) but I know that January is often hard for many. That's more and more true for me as I get older, too. I'm not that sorry to see it go this year. 

    February brings us one step further into the year. It brings some plans for this year closer to fruition – new patterns among them, but also travel. I have a trip later this month, but I'm also really looking forward to heading back to Edinburgh this March for Edinburgh Yarn Festival. I went in 2016 and enjoyed it so very much, and it's hard to believe that was three years ago. I'm very excited and very grateful to be going back. We are also in the midst of figuring out what the second half of this year looks like, since our Canadian work permits come to an end later this summer and we're not 100% sure what our next move will be. (That doesn't mean we don't have ideas we've been working on, but there are factors outside of our control that play a large role.) So this winter feels like a little bit of limbo. And so I work. And bake. 

    I have also been very tuned in to the conversation about racism in the knitting community that began towards the beginning of January. I think it's a very important conversation to be having, and one that's long overdue. I've been listening to the voices of many of the BIPOC (black, indigenous, people of color) members of this community because their words deserve our attention. It's hard to cover very much in the space of a short blog, but I wanted to acknowledge it here because it is important. 

    If you are a white knitter like I am, I hope you recognize that everyone who has shared their experiences with racism or microagressions in this community is facing into their own past trauma every time they share those stories, and if you are shocked by the experiences they have shared ("I can't believe this is happening in 2019!"), recognize that being able to feel that is the white privilege that they are referring to. Please have the respect to believe them. Please understand that they cannot, will not just "stick to knitting" because even in the knitting community they face exclusion based on the color of their skin. Defensiveness is a common reaction from white people when they are faced with the everyday racism our societies are entrenched in, and if you feel that, I would suggest you sit with that and give yourself some time to reflect before you speak up about it; if someone shares their experiences with racism with you and the first thing you say back to them is some version of, "but not all white people!", the impact of that is to dismiss and minimize that already marginalized voice. Maybe "I'm so sorry you've been treated that way" is a better starting point. Also keep in mind that when knitters share the experiences of racism they have faced and they talk about white privilege, they are not saying that you, as a white knitter, have never been discriminated against for other reasons – just that you haven't been discriminated against because of your race. Ageism, ableism, homophobia, these are all real too. And those conversations are happening too. But the conversation at large has been about racism. If you're looking for resources to educate yourself about these issues, let me know in the comments and I'll do my best to recommend some books/podcasts/articles, depending on what you're looking for.

    If you are a BIPOC member of this community, know that I see you, and I hear your words, and I am listening. I am so grateful for the expereiences and perspective everyone has shared that have opened my eyes and I am so sorry you have had to live those experiences. You are welcome here, and if I ever do or say anything that makes you feel unwelcome, I hope you will call me out on it. 

    Edited to add: I turned on comment moderation when I published this post, because I want the comment section to be a safe space for BIPOC. If you submit a comment that I feel would make BIPOC feel unheard or unsafe, I (and only I) will see it but I won't be approving that comment to appear here. You're free to speak your mind on your own platforms, but this is my space and I will do what I can to keep it a safe and inclusive one.